Tag Archives: reading

Every year, new books are released to address the myriad choices, complications, and challenges inherent in today’s college admissions environment. Most of these works, however, are notably nonfiction. Rarely does a story as dramatic or suspenseful as Girls with Bright Futures break through to become part of the college admissions canon. But after the 2019 Operation Varsity Blues bribery scandal, the admissions process–especially at the most selective schools–no longer seems so innocent. Girls with Bright Futures is described as an “irreverent and suspenseful novel exploring the privilege and scandal of an elite Seattle community as a group of mothers become embroiled in college admissions mayhem.” First time authors and long-time friends Tracy Dobmeier and Wendy Katzman definitely deliver on the promise of a college admissions thriller about “Three women. Three daughters. And a promise that they’ll each get what they deserve.” I was invited to speak about this fun book…

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We all know that today’s teens should read more, but the more salient questions about why or what they should read often go unanswered. Mike Bergin of Chariot Learning has answers to share in the form of research supported facts and strategies for building regular reading habits. What will teens and their parents learn from this free interactive online seminar? Is reading a skill that can be improved? How often should teens read to unlock real mastery? What are the benefits of stronger reading skills? How do broad reading skills impact school grades and test scores? What nonfiction and fiction books are best for high schoolers? With limited time available, what kind of reading should teens prioritize?      Can’t make this date? Ask when we’re offering our next Why–And What–Teens Should Read Outside of School seminar.   This seminar is free, but advance registration is required. Register through our…

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A sophisticated college-level vocabulary is so last century, at least as far as the SAT, ACT, and possibly colleges themselves are concerned. The priority for today’s academics and knowledge workers is graphical literacy. ACT was actually ahead of the curve on this one with the data-rich Science Test, but College Board only got the memo in the last decade. The 2015 revision of the SAT Reading section jettisoned the last of the discrete vocabulary questions in part to make room for a new and unfamiliar–at least to the SAT–addition: passage-based graphs. The Reading section of the current SAT presents 52 questions across 5 passages covering a wide range of topics. Test takers can expect 3 of those passages to present natural and social science topics, and these passages can include a total of 3-4 graphs. Usually each passage will hold 2 graphs but sometimes a single one appears. The most…

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As we’ve said time and time again, reading is fundamental. Well, we didn’t make that phrase up, but we love to spread it around. After all, reading enriching books at least a little bit every day delivers the kinds of benefits we all want for ourselves and our children: improved comprehension (which means more knowledge as well as better grades and scores) increased speed (which mean less time doing homework, more test questions answered, and greater productivity) advanced vocabulary (which means more sophisticated, persuasive communication) decreased frustration (which means reading becomes more enjoyable, which inspires even more reading) Plus, regular readers exhibit greater levels of happiness, community engagement, and mental health. What more could you want for your high schooler? We launched our Strategic Reading Club to provide the structure, direction, and discussion many teens need to engage in real reading on a regular basis. We’ve also revised the structure…

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Those of you who remember the old RIF commercials will probably chuckle at the reference, but the statement is as true today as it was back then: reading is fundamental. Strong reading and writing skills lie at the heart of the best grades, most impressive SAT & ACT scores, and most enduring professional success. Just because someone knows how to read doesn’t mean she reads well. Reading is a skill-based activity that improves with focused practice. That means that students should know how to read properly and then internalize the right strategies by reading challenging level-appropriate texts on a regular basis (HINT: National Geographic may be level-appropriate, but People magazine never is!) The benefits of exceptional reading skills are almost limitless, but include many obvious and highly desirable advantages: increased reading speed (which mean less time doing homework) improved comprehension (which means more knowledge as well as better grades and…

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Every SAT Reading section includes one passage or a pair of passages from what can be considered a historical document. Sometimes, the passage will be an excerpt from a U.S. founding document like the Declaration of Independence, the Bill of Rights, or the Federalist Papers. Other times, the test will feature an influential text or speech excerpt from the Great Global Conversation on equality, rights, and the nature of civic life. For many obvious reasons, students struggle with these passages. Not only are they usually archaic but they demand a clear understanding of persuasive writing and argumentation. Find out in this seminar how to understand and excel on even the toughest SAT historical documents passages!   The fee for this one-hour seminar is $30 .   Advance registration is required. Register through our Student Information Form and specify the SAT Historical Documents seminar. We will reply to registrants by email…

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