Tag Archives: MBTI

Personality seems like a rather… personal attribute that we may only share with certain people, offering others only a facade or idealized self. And we may think we succeed in hiding our true selves from the masses, but we reveal ourselves through our deeds. “You are what you do, not what you say you’ll do,” as far as C.G. Jung was concerned. That’s why the last Myers-Briggs Type Indicator focused on how we act in relation to the outside world. Judging (J) types seek order in all things while Perceiving (P) types prefer spontaneity and flexibility.   Judging people should not be considered judgmental (though they may be sometimes) but rather judicious or sensible. Not comfortable with pushing deadlines, Judging types prefer work before play and schedule accordingly. Having a feeling of closure puts Judging types most at ease. Judging types prefer clearly defined tasks with specific timelines and deadlines.…

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Decisions, decisions… we make them all day, every day. Did you ever notice that we can often tell as much about a person by the way she makes decisions than by what she decides? According to the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, we all fall into one of two camps: Thinking (T) types make decisions based on objective facts, logic, and reason, while Feeling (F) types are guided more by personal concerns, values, and relationships.   Thinking people make decisions with their heads, not their hearts. Relying heavily on logic elementary principles, Thinkers like to weigh pros and cons without allowing personal issues to influence the decision making process. Thinking types prefer fact-based, objective instruction with clear course objectives. Seek out logical reasons to engage in learning Be diplomatic with teachers and peers so as to avoid misunderstandings Before you challenge an idea, be sure to consider all possibilities   Feeling people…

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Every waking moment of the day, particularly at school, we are bombarded by information. To make sense of this storm of stimuli, each of us creates filters, protocols by which we prioritize what type of information we prefer to focus on. The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator splits us into two groups: Sensing people tend to pay attention to what their five senses tell them, while Intuitive types focus on underlying patterns. Sensing types draw upon common sense and direct experience to deal with problems. They are most concerned with the present moment and that which is palpable, concrete, and real. Often detail-oriented and rule-focused, Sensors prefer to understand concepts at the smallest level of understanding, then expand into a bigger picture. Sensing types prefer to learn a new task by being shown how to do it. Break down new material step by step Think of real life examples of abstract concepts…

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You have probably heard the terms “extrovert” and “introvert.” According to the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, the difference between extraversion (yes, the word is spelled this way in the MBTI) and introversion is the attitude people use to direct their energy. All of us have traits of each, but tend to rely on one more heavily than the other. Extraverts draw their energy from the external world. You know the type: outgoing, life-of-the-party, gregarious, can carry on conversations with anyone about a multitude of topics. The process of interacting with others and engaging with the world energizes the extrovert. As you’d expect, Extraverts prefer active learning and engaging with others: Study in groups where you can bounce ideas off of others Choose learning partners who are motivated to stay on task Employ active listening and reading practices   Introverts, on the other hand, draw their energy from their internal worlds of…

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Imagine two students in a classroom in Any High School, USA. One struggles to concentrate on what the teacher is saying, but finds himself daydreaming instead. Mind ablaze with different ideas, some only tangentially related to the subject at hand, he texts a note about how boring the teacher is to his best friend. She, however, is so busy taking notes, engaged in what she considers a brilliant lecture, that she doesn’t even notice the text. What accounts for the discrepancies in the ways different students experience the same lessons, teachers, and subjects? Some much of the variation comes down to learning style. All of us learn in different ways, not just in the sense of visual, auditory, and tactile processing, but based on deeper factors. Personality types can shed a lot of light on your specific learning style. Any student enrolled in our Roots2Words: Personalities and Perspective Words program…

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