Tag Archives: education

People who aren’t involved in education might be surprised to learn what an ever-changing field it is. We’re always learning new things about learning, and teachers are always switching up their techniques to find out what works best. One approach to teaching that’s making waves in schools around the country is the “flipped classroom” model, which literally turns traditional teaching methods on their head. Conventional education is based largely on Bloom’s Taxonomy, which you might have seen represented as a pyramid with simple, concrete goals at the bottom and abstract, complex tasks at the very top. Classrooms traditionally devote instructional time to the bottom of the pyramid; that is, relaying basic facts and testing for recall, and leave the critical thinking and formulation of original ideas for students to complete at home. But in 2012, high school chemistry teachers Johnathan Bergmann and Aaron Sams argued that this is completely backwards,…

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To say that I hated math growing up would be like saying that the sun is hot. I despised math. I dreaded math class every single school day from the ages of 8 to 18. There are 180 school days in a year, and assuming each class lasts an hour, that’s 180 hours per year. Over a period of 10 years, I spent 1800 hours, not even counting homework, wishing I was doing anything else but math. But, I just sat down and did math, if only to drive home a point. And, it was kind of fun. I crunched the numbers and figured out how much time I spent hating math, and realized I don’t actually hate it anymore. What changed? It turns out that math isn’t boring; math classes are–or at least were in my case. I couldn’t tell you why, but math is the one subject that…

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In March 2022, the National Test Prep Association published the following persuasive post on How Standardized Testing Benefits Society, shared here with permission.

Higher education has long been recognized as the doorway to opportunity. A college degree represents far more than proof of extended academic inquiry, which carries, of course, its own rewards. We connect undergraduate and graduate education to highly coveted outcomes like better careers, more money, and increased job satisfaction. College graduates even enjoy better health. Sure, college entails a steep investment that increases every year, but that investment pays off tremendously generation after generation. Yet, even though American higher education attracts the best and brightest from all over the world, a rising number of citizens doubt its value. According to Pew Research Center, a majority of Republicans and Republican-leaning independents (58%) now say that colleges and universities have a negative effect on the country. Evidence, of course, proves otherwise. Colleges themselves drive regional prosperity. For example, Rochester’s largest employer is no longer one of the giants of old like Xerox…

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Despite spending seemingly interminable days at school or doing homework, teens aren’t necessarily learning everything they need for happy, productive lives. Some may even argue that an emphasis on academia overlooks the most important life skills. Melanie Pinola put together a terrific list of Top 10 Skills We Wish Were Taught In School, But Usually Aren’t that is worth a look. Here are her top 10: 1. How To Apply For Jobs And Handle Interviews 2. Mental Health 3. Basic Self-Defense 4. Negotiation Skills 5. Survival Skills 6. Basic Money Management 7. Study Skills (Or Learning How To Learn) 8. Time Management Techniques 9. Speed Reading 10. Computer Science Of course, we work with students on some of these essential skills while our partners cover others. And some of these skills are way outside our scope of service. I generally agree with the author’s findings, but find little evidence that Speed Reading has any…

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