Tag Archives: College Board

The computer-based administration of the new digital SAT and PSAT may appear to be the most significant transformation to these enduring exams. However, many schools that use the SAT or ACT as state tests have been administering computer versions of the paper test for years. CBT SATs and ACTs have been the norm in some parts of the world for years. The dSAT won’t be like those tests. The digital SAT represents a massive departure from the way the test has historically been scored. No longer will every question from the easiest to the most challenging be worth the same single raw score point. Instead, the dSAT is a section adaptive test. Adaptive tests often entail complex scoring algorithms, but the concept behind them is simple. In an adaptive test, performance on one question or section determines the difficulty and corresponding score weight of upcoming questions or sections. The digital…

Read more

For nearly a century, the SAT has been revised on a regular basis to reflect educational priorities in reading, writing, and math. However, every version of the test has shared one fundamental trait–it was administered on paper. Not anymore! The newest version of the SAT has been rebuilt from the ground up to embody the first truly digital expression of this assessment, as opposed to current computer-based presentations of the paper-and-pencil SAT and ACT. Such a dramatic departure from the norm demands careful consideration of all the elements of testing we typically take for granted: 1. WHERE? The digital SAT and PSAT will still, at least for the near future, be administered at conventional test centers, which usually means high schools. 2. WHEN? Again, the immediate future of the digital SAT will follow the current practice of morning administrations on national test dates, along with various Sunday and school-day administrations.…

Read more

Every decade, it seems, gets its own version of the SAT. This exam–one of America’s most influential and controversial tests–has endeavored to reflect college readiness and the nation’s educational priorities since 1926. The newest revision charts a bold path to the future of standardized assessments while still channeling the reading, writing, and quantitative problem solving priorities that have been foundational to SAT success for nearly a century. The most visible and glaring change will be an entirely digital SAT and PSAT for just about every student. The dSAT, as the new version of the test is known, has been the only SAT available outside the United States since March 2023. Domestic students will experience the revised exam in two stages: October 2023: Students will take the digital PSAT. March 2024: Students will begin taking the digital SAT. At this time, College Board holds that the switch from the current version…

Read more

The PSAT/NMSQT serves a number of valuable functions; not only does this test act as the first criterion for National Merit Scholarship recognition, but its scores also offer insight into future SAT results. No, the PSAT is not exactly like the official SAT or even a well-proctored practice SAT, but PSAT scores should give high school juniors a fairly accurate sense of how–in the absence of any other prep, of course–they will score on the SAT. What should we infer, then, from October’s alarmingly low PSAT scores? Anecdotal information has finally been confirmed by College Board, though not in any forum available to the general public. Fortunately, Art Sawyer and his colleagues at Compass Education Group pieced together the fragmented reports available to suss out some alarming conclusions: The number of juniors scoring 1400+ dropped 30%, from 71,000 to less than 50,000. The number of sophomores scoring 1400+ dropped 36%.…

Read more

The college admissions is abuzz with news of a new data point College Board has been testing for student score reports. No, the SAT won’t feature any new question types, content areas, or sections anytime soon. In fact, this metric not only resists conventional forms of test preparation but also sets a standard that would have most families chasing the lowest scores possible. Meet the College Board’s new adversity score. Officially called the Environmental Context Dashboard, the adversity score is meant to quantify the challenges students face at home, in school, and in their neighborhoods. The current tool takes 15 factors into account, ranging from neighborhood poverty level and crime rates to high school class size and family stability. The full range of factors and how they are weighted and calculated are currently unknown. These scores, scaled from 1-100 with higher values signaling greater hardship, will only be available to…

Read more

The metaphor of “many moving parts” to describe a highly complex operation can be applied to many tasks in life, including college admissions. The entire process–from choosing schools to earning top SAT & ACT scores to completing the application–can take months or even years, yet still result in frustration and failure. How can we encourage teens to lean into the college admissions process in a proactive and effective fashion? College Board has an idea: MONEY. That’s right, the organization behind the SAT has created College Board Opportunity Scholarships to celebrate and reward the effort students put into getting ready for college: WHAT DO I HAVE TO DO? College Board will reward six steps in the college admissions process. By completing each step, students become eligible for the scholarship associated with that step. Students who complete all six steps are also eligible for the seventh Complete Your Journey scholarship. 1. Build…

Read more

6/17