Tag Archives: college

The greatest enemy of knowledge, according to Daniel J. Boorstin, is not ignorance. Rather, it is the illusion of knowledge. We think we possess accurate knowledge of academic readiness when we look at grades, but those numbers rarely tell the whole story. Grades tell most of the story of a student’s ability but can be subjective, unfair, or even inflated. Adding data from state or national standardized tests adds necessary clarity and context to grades, which is where the SAT and ACT come in. Both tests mainly provide value as college entrance exams. However, by pegging certain test scores to likely outcomes in college classes, they can also help forecast how students might perform once they begin undergraduate-level work . We’ve been tracking the disappointing trends illuminated by ACT College Readiness Benchmarks for years. Might SAT College and Career Readiness Benchmarks provide a rosier outlook on our nation’s future college…

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Of all the innovations in secondary education we’ve experienced over the last several decades, few have been more impactful yet less well known than early college high schools. Early college high school programs date back to the 1960’s but really took off with the Early College High School Initiative (ECHSI) in 2002. Since then, these schools have served tens of thousands of high schoolers across the United States. Early college high schools, also known as early colleges, offer students the opportunity to earn an Associate’s degree or up to 2 years of college credits toward a Bachelor’s degree in high school. Early colleges also provide support to students as they plan for their college education, helping them select college courses, transfer to a 4-year college, and identify sources of financial aid. The emphasis early colleges place on higher education separate them from classic vocational programs focusing more on professional trades.…

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With so many critics screeching for an end to standardized exams, you’d think their primary objections centered around how anachronistic #2 pencils seem in a digital age or how debilitating the pressure of a high stakes test can be for parents. Sometimes, though, the real threat of testing lies in what truths the scores reveal. Even if you loathe the idea of college entrance exams playing a significant role in college admissions–even though you shouldn’t–you’ll want to consider the implications of ACT’s annual College Readiness Benchmarks report. College Readiness Benchmarks are the minimum scores in each section of the ACT associated with a 50% chance of earning a B or better and approximately a 75% chance of earning a C or better in the corresponding college course or courses: ACT English is associated with introductory English Composition classes. The ACT Benchmark for English is a scale score of 18, which…

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One reason why college admissions officials put so much weight on SAT and ACT scores is that the test makers put so much weight on what matters in college. Of course, a single exam cannot hope to encapsulate all of the skills, knowledge, and support that enable a student to thrive at the undergraduate level. The right exams can, however, try to forecast success in that first critical year of college. ACT addresses this with their annual College Readiness Benchmarks. College Readiness Benchmarks are the minimum scores in each section of the ACT associated with a 50% chance of earning a B or better and approximately a 75% chance of earning a C or better in the corresponding college course or courses: ACT English is associated with introductory English Composition classes. The ACT Benchmark for English is a scale score of 18, which is 39th percentile. ACT Math is associated…

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Did you know that only 38% of public and 53% of private bachelor’s degree-seeking students finish school in four years? How can you improve the odds for your son or daughter? Edie Steele, Ph.D. of Finish In Four will show how to finish college in 4 years. Covered are pitfalls to avoid and tips to save time, money and stress. This free presentation is ideal for parents of high school students in grades 9 – 12. Seats are limited and advance registration by phone or email is required. Sign up today!

For a growing number of our nation’s teens, the question is never, “Am I ready to go to college?” Rather, they ask, “How soon can I get there?!” But the first question deserves further consideration. Since 2003, the twelfth-grade mathematics and reading assessments from the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) have been used as an indicator of students’ academic preparedness for college. According to the 2015 data released in The Nation’s Report Card, only 37% of twelfth-graders met the standard for success in mathematics or reading. Even more troubling, the percents of students meeting preparedness standards are down across the board from last year. College readiness is no joke. Students who arrive at school with deficient math, reading, and writing skills face a higher likelihood of struggle and failure. Even the ones who don’t drop out are forced to take remedial no-credit classes, which extends the already pricey proposition…

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