Tag Archives: cheating

While the current college admissions cheating scandal has left most Americans appropriately mortified, some people consistently take away the wrong messages. Do not conflate access with achievement. The slur about scions of privilege who are “born on third base and go through life thinking they hit a triple” stings because we instinctively recognize the emptiness of unearned rewards. How, then, should students acquire the test scores, grades, and achievements that will win access to the colleges of their–not their parents’–dreams? Earn them. All parents, even the misguided malefactors at the heart of these cheating scandals, want the best for their children. Real success in life comes from real effort, sacrifice, and even struggle to confront challenges, overcome obstacles, and forge authentic skill and character. If you don’t quite believe that success is connected to hard work, take some lessons from those that have experienced massive amounts of both: The price…

Read more

Unless you were raised by dishonorable wolves, you know all too well what all of us learn when we’re young: cheating is wrong. That cold, hard truth applies in every situation, no matter how important the moment may seem. In fact, the most critical inflection points in our lives require the highest levels of integrity, as even minor failings of character can have long-lasting and profound implications. Given all of this, you might be surprised at the depths to which some people will sink to attain advantage in college admissions. News of a college admissions cheating scandal–complete with celebrities, social media stars, and a catchy FBI codename–has rendered most Americans aghast at the excesses of parental ambition and educational malfeasance. Others may be analyzing this sordid story for different reasons, namely for insight on how to cheat your way into the college of your dreams. Cheating on the SAT and…

Read more

As surely as a new school year brings holidays and seasonal events, the same SAT and ACT test dates we’ve always known appear with comforting certainty. Students will take the SAT in early September, the SAT in early October, then the mid-October PSAT, then the ACT again, and so on and so on. Test dates may shift around from time to time, but once etched on the calendar, they are locked in (weather permitting, of course). The College Board has never cancelled a U.S. administration of the SAT. But recent events may strain even the clockwork consistency of our nation’s oldest testmaker. Earlier this month, Reuters reported that a person with access to SAT material in development provided the news organization with hundreds of confidential test questions and answers. Reuters has not published any of this test material, but did confirm its authenticity with the College Board, who, through an…

Read more

Cheating on a test is wrong–unquestionably, irredeemably wrong. Using unethical or illegal means to inflate a test score not only penalizes those who follow the rules but also harms both those who use the test scores and the cheaters themselves. One needs very little imagination to see how SAT scores divorced from the actual levels of math, English, and critical reasoning ability those scores are meant to reflect lead to very bad college admissions outcomes. So, do not ever cheat on the SAT or any other test. That said, you may really, really, really want a higher score than you are capable of earning, even with expert help. Once you open your mind to even the possibility of using unfair means, you may come to recognize an eternal truth: where there are tests, there is cheating. The history of the SAT is rich with examples of test takers angling for…

Read more

4/4