Tag Archives: admissions

At Chariot Learning, we have all kinds of effective ways to help students earn impressive test scores while learning critical academic and executive skills. With summer coming, you’re probably looking for help with testing as well as the larger higher education admissions process. Following are some of the essential resources we recommend for our prep students and all test takers, but feel free to contact us if you don’t see what you are looking for: GETTING STARTED Whether you are working with Chariot Learning or not, you’ll be able to better understand any and every aspect of test prep and admissions with these trusted sources: Chariot Learning Frequently Asked Questions Tests and the Rest college admissions podcast College Road parent newsletter Upstate College Conversations Facebook group Chariot Learning Motivational Instagram COLLEGE ADMISSIONS AND TESTING FOR THE HS CLASSES OF 2022 AND 2023 Understand the current admissions landscape better with this…

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That old adage about having to spend money to make money has never been more true than in reference to college. Among the many clear benefits of a college education are measurably improved average lifetime earnings an a higher likelihood of a satisfying career. But those benefits come at a cost, one that seems to practically double every year. How much has the cost of college really increased over the last ten years? Unsurprisingly, our friends at the College Board happen to track this exact information. Their comprehensive analysis of Tuition and Fees and Room and Board over Time provides exactly the information we are looking for, especially after some additional calculations. Private Non-Profit Four Year Schools Average tuition for private non-profit four year schools in 2021-22 was $38,070. Average tuition for private non-profit four year schools in 2011-12 was $33,320. That increase of $4,750 over a decade represents a…

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Every student and parent in the U.S. knows that there’s a lot of pressure on kids to be “smart.” In fact, intelligence is very cool right now—Gen Z, or everyone born in the mid-90s or later, is the most educated generation in American history. The hashtag #BookTok on TikTok, where readers share book-related content and bond over their love of reading, has over fifty billion views. Quintessentially geeky games like Dungeons & Dragons and Magic: The Gathering are more popular now than they’ve ever been. If it’s brains versus brawn, brains are enjoying a winning streak these days. But society tends towards a pretty limited view of what intelligence really means. In our public school system, it’s easy to feel like you’re not smart if you can’t hack homework or ace tests. The SAT and ACT especially are mistaken for intelligence tests, even though they’re definitely not. Being book-smart is…

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Over 75% of colleges no longer require submission of SAT/ACT scores for admission. Has this been the expected boon for students? Has it led to increased diversity and equity? Dr. Linda Hirsch of The City University of New York invited me to speak about a test-optional admissions process and its unexpected implications for students and colleges. If you still think TO has been a net boon for students or society, watch this video!

Is Sal Khan the most respected individual in education today or just one of the most respected individuals in education? The founder of Khan Academy, the gold standard in academic training videos, has done more to “provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere” than, well, anyone, anywhere. While Sal’s been busy launching yet another free academic resource, he recently shared his thoughts on testing, test-optional admissions, and equity in an insightful interview with THE Journal. Here are some of his more salient points along with some editorial commentary: THE Journal: Is the SAT still relevant, now that many colleges and universities have made test scores optional for admission? SK: When I talk to admissions officers, behind closed doors, they will tell you that making tests optional did not remove the need for them to get a signal of college readiness from applicants. The reality is that savvy students continue…

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Whether you’re a high schooler or the parent of one, you probably have hundreds of good questions about the SAT and ACT. Here are some of the most common: What are the benefits of taking the ACT or SAT? Are the ACT and SAT accepted by colleges equally? How can you find out which test you are best suited for? When should you take the ACT or SAT? What are the best ways to practice and prepare for the tests? Are all prep methods equally viable for all students regardless of learning style or motivation? Everything about taking the SAT and ACT has become more complicated and nuanced, from the subject matter to the test format to the when, where, how, and why of getting a great score. That’s why we’ve been publishing articles every week for the last 13 years on the Chariot Learning blog and elsewhere, speaking at…

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