Tag Archives: accommodations

Many students need testing accommodations on the SAT or ACT, but not every student who needs them gets them. Whether you are looking for extended time or a different testing accommodation, consider the qualifications. The College Board identifies four clear criteria for eligibility for accommodations for a suite of tests, including the SAT, SAT Subject Tests, PSAT/NMSQT, PSAT 10, or AP Exams. ACT requirements are similar, but note that the two testing authorities qualify students independently; sometimes, a student will be approved for accommodations on one test but not the other. 1. A documented disability Eligibility requires a formal diagnosis from an approved expert. Doctor’s notes or IEPs are not sufficient. Appropriate documentation is always required, but not always reviewed by the College Board. Documentation will very likely be reviewed in the following instances: testing is not current a student has not had an IEP or 504 Plan for at…

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Both the College Board and ACT, Inc. are committed to ensuring fair and accurate test results by providing appropriate accommodations to examinees with documented disabilities. And while four out of five applications for accommodations request extended time, the other 20% provided cover a wide range of accommodations to meet a variety of special needs. Computers and Scribes Students with dysgraphia, physical disabilities that impair their ability to write, or other severe language-based learning disorders may qualify for a computer or scribe. These accommodations are not automatically given to students that use computers as part of their school accommodations. Typically, the accommodation provided is a school computer that may be used as a word processor to record essay and short-answer responses; spell-check, grammar-check, word prediction, and cut-and-paste functions are disabled. Students requiring greater assistance in submitting responses may be permitted to dictate to a scribe. Dysgraphia can be grounds for accommodations,…

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The College Board will be leading us all through a lot of unexplored territory with the major upcoming revision to the SAT. Luckily for them, though perhaps unluckily for some high school students, the October PSAT will provide a much-needed test run. Since the next PSAT will be delivered in the new format, students will have to contend with unfamiliar question types and rules. Correspondingly, the College Board is receiving questions it hasn’t heard before…   “Can a student with a math learning disability receive an accommodation to use a calculator on the new No Calculator Math section?”   Variations of this question are sure to make up the most common accommodations question for the new PSAT and SAT. Unfortunately, as of the moment of publication of this article, the test maker hasn’t released much information on the issue. Fortunately, though, I called and queried a representative from the College…

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