Tag Archives: accommodations

Standardized tests like the SAT and ACT would be a whole lot easier if we were allowed to bring them home to take at our leisure. Unfortunately, these anxiety-provoking exams are defined in part by their stringent time limits. The minutes allotted per section often seem insufficient compared to the number and complexity of questions to be answered. Of course, time management is part of the test! But some students have diagnosed disabilities that allow additional time for academic tasks. With the proper documentation, these accommodations can be applied to SAT and ACT administrations. Most test takers who are approved for this time of accommodation will receive Extended Time, while Double Time or Special Testing is reserved for students with more serious needs. These are the Extended Time regulations for the tests as of January 2024: Extended Time Extended Time is the most common accommodation approved for test takers. In…

Read more

While American culture celebrates individual differences and promotes diversity, many of our societal systems struggle with anyone who deviates too far from an accepted norm. This can certainly be the case in school; the entire model of group instruction depends on cohorts that learn the same material in the same way at the same pace. Obviously, not every child fits this mold. Advancing understanding of the way humans think and learn has changed our dialogue around learning disabilities. Instead of framing challenges as disorders, we now look at divergence. Sociologist Judy Singer coined the term neurodiversity to describe “the limitless variability of human cognition and the uniqueness of each human mind.” Assuming that someone is disabled because he doesn’t learn the way his classmates does represents outdated beliefs that ignore what we’ve always accepted about people: disadvantages in some areas generally accompany advantages in other areas. Thus, neurodivergent simply describes…

Read more

One reason I love hosting the Tests and the Rest podcast is because I meet so many smart and interesting educators, then learn from them. That’s why interviewing counselor Emily Kircher-Morris on the topic of college admissions for twice-exceptional students was such a treat. Once Emily explained what twice-exceptional or 2E meant, I realized how many 2E learners I’d met and worked with in the past. So you should listen to that podcast episode and learn as well! Another reason love hosting the Tests and the Rest podcast is that meeting these remarkable professionals often sparks further collaboration. Emily happens to be the host of the Mind Matters Podcast, which features discussions with leaders in the fields of psychology, education, and beyond, with an emphasis on gifted/talented and twice-exceptional children and adults. Imagine how flattered I was when she invited me and my Tests and the Rest co-host Amy Seeley…

Read more

Extended time on the ACT and SAT has always been a boon to those students who require that accommodation. However, the two testing organizations deployed the 150% time allotment differently, such that ACT Extended Time has been widely perceived as more advantageous than the SAT version. Too bad that’s all about to change. To clarify, students who qualify for National Extended Time on the ACT currently receive a total of five hours for the four multiple choice sections alone, with an additional hour for the optional Writing Test. Test takers have the freedom to allocate their time on the multiple-choice sections as they see fit, which means a student could conceivably spend double time or more on some sections and even less than standard time on others. This contrasts with the SAT policy of granting 50% more time per section than usual. However, ACT is about to adopt an extended…

Read more

For the past couple of years, I’ve been meeting with the Brighton PTSA (my home district!) to explain the ins and outs of applying for accommodations on the SAT and ACT. This year, my presentation was recorded for the benefit of parents who couldn’t make the live event. If you have questions about what accommodations are available for the SAT and ACT as well as how best to apply for them, enjoy the show! Note that I reference a PowerPoint deck throughout the presentation that somehow didn’t make the video. No worries though, as the links below present every point in superior detail. How do I apply for testing accommodations? What kind of accommodations are available on the ACT and SAT? Do I or my student qualify for testing accommodations? What are the extended time rules for the ACT and SAT? Are there special accommodations for English language learners?

High stakes tests should, along with being valid and reliable, always be fair. Fairness entails equitable treatment of those living with physical or mental impairments that substantially limit major activities or functions. When a standardized exam is used as a criterion for educational admissions, licensing, certification, or credentialing, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) ensures that individuals with disabilities have the opportunity to fairly compete for such opportunities. The provision of needed testing accommodations by testing entities permits test-takers with disabilities to demonstrate their true aptitude. All the organizations administering admissions exams for secondary, undergraduate, or graduate programs adhere assiduously to ADA requirements and offer clear public guidance on how to apply for testing accommodations. Applying for SAT Accommodations Applying for ACT Accommodations Applying for SSAT Accommodations Applying for ISEE Accommodations Applying for GRE Accommodations Applying for GMAT Accommodations Applying for LSAT Accommodations Applying for MCAT Accommodations 1. The application…

Read more

6/10