Category Archives: Test Prep

The American public has been anxiously unpacking the implications of the announcement by ACT that that average ACT scores for the high school class of 2022 declined to lowest level in more than 30 years. I recently shared deeper analysis and context for the announcement on this site, but those who enjoyed video to text will enjoy the brief segment on the topic I contributed to on WROC News 8. What conclusions do you draw from declining test scores?

In the march to your best possible ACT score, nothing can replace the benefits of full-length, proctored practice testing. Considering how busy everyone is these days, getting a group of test takers into the same room for practice has become tougher every year. But you can still enjoy almost all of the benefits of proctored practice testing right from the comfort of your own home with the Chariot Learning ACT AutoProctor! How do you use the ACT AutoProctor? Easy! Just assemble everything you need for a high-quality proctored practice test in Standard Time, ideally on an open morning in your schedule, and start the ACT AutoProctor video. I’ll walk you through every step of the testing process from beginning to break to end in 3 hours, 16 minutes. What else do you need to do to make this testing experience complete? 1. Use a printed official-released ACT. 2. Prepare your…

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Did your parents ever give you a big plate of fish for dinner, telling you it was “brain food”? Maybe you wondered how it made any sense that salmon could make you smarter, but as it turns out, there’s a little bit of truth to it. Nutritionists and physicians have studied so-called superfoods for decades, decoding the science behind their supposed effects on the human body, and there have been tons of foods with observed positive impacts on the brain: Fish, of course, but more specifically fish high in omega-3 fatty acids, like salmon, trout and sardines. Turmeric, a powerful antioxidant that’s a staple in curries. Blueberries, blackberries, and other dark berries are full of antioxidants and can combat inflammation across the whole body. Broccoli, which supplies the Vitamin K that’s a building block of the fat in brain cells. Nuts of every kind have nutrients that are linked to…

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The National Merit Scholarship Program is an annual academic competition for recognition and college undergraduate scholarships. According to the National Merit Scholarship Corporation, which was established in 1955, over 1.5 million students in about 21,000 high schools enter the National Merit Scholarship Program each year, with about 50,000 entrants qualifying for program recognition, and approximately 8,050 outstanding students receiving scholarships valued collectively at over $35 million for college undergraduate study. The primary way students enter the National Merit Program by taking the Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test (PSAT/NMSQT), almost always in 11th grade. For many students, a shot at scholarship recognition may be the only good reason to sit for the PSAT. After all, the PSAT is not relevant in college admissions, is not exactly a practice SAT, and doesn’t provide test scores early enough in junior year for many students to act on. That said, there are plenty…

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For high schoolers, the academic year roars in with early opportunities to take the SAT & ACT. With the addition of an awesome August SAT administration, October no longer serves as the first chance to take either test. However, the month of fall foliage and Halloween treats is still one of the best times to take the SAT and ACT. What’s so great about October, besides pumpkin spice lattes? So early in the school year, classes haven’t really ramped up, which affords busy students a bit of breathing room to prep for the big tests. Most extracurricular activities, with the notable exception of fall sports, are equally slow to start. Thus, students can actually focus on the tests in October. However, other reasons sweeten the deal for October for 11th and 12th graders alike. SENIORS, even those late to the college admissions party, enter October feeling the pressure to finalize…

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Every ambitious or engaged high schooler knows the pain of trying to juggle academic, extracurricular, and social (especially social) commitments, while at the same time prepping for the big tests and working on college applications. Teens tempted to relent in any one area realize that competitive colleges care about more than just grades and test scores; those extracurricular activities matter. The good news from ACT, Inc. suggests that maybe you can have it all. According to ACT’s report on The Condition of College & Career Readiness 2019, involvement in high school activities is often associated with higher ACT Composite scores. ACT researchers cross-referenced average ACT Composite Score and number of activities for graduates of the high school class of 2019, distributing students by GPA. Based on the data, involvement in several high school activities is often associated with higher ACT Composite scores, no matter what a student’s GPA is. However,…

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