Category Archives: Psychology

The last two years of high school are typically when students begin focusing on their future, though this process seems to begin earlier and earlier. Teenagers begin to dream of their ultimate college and start buckling down with standardized test prep while balancing extracurricular activities, volunteering, sports, jobs, and whatever else they deem important to getting into Dream School U. Having worked closely with teenagers over the last seven years, I hear more often than not: “I am SO stressed!” Teenage Millennials put more pressure on themselves than any other generation, and most of their stress is self-induced. They have their eyes on the future and the future holds no room for failure. But, we all know that success is often achieved because of the lessons learned during failed attempts. It becomes important, then, to have a conversation about what success means and how successful people deal with failure:  …

Read more

The road to college is often a stressful time, and it is no different for Millennials who are about to embark on the journey. Howe and Strauss (2003) defined seven character traits of this generation and how these traits factor into the college admissions process. The traits of the Millennial cohort include the following: Feeling special Being sheltered Having great confidence Being team-oriented Holding conventional and traditional beliefs Feeling great pressure Attaining high-achievement Combine all these traits together and it becomes a formula for an incredibly stressful college planning time. According to Howe and Strauss (2003), Millennials are different from Boomers or Generation X-ers in that they feel that “their problems are the nation’s problems, that their future is the country’s future” (p. 2). This is a responsibility that Millennials take on with great pride, but feeling weight of an entire country’s future is a heavy burden to bear! Millennials…

Read more

Sleep and learning are inextricably linked. Albert Camus understood the connection: “Some people talk in their sleep. Lecturers talk while other people sleep.” But the sleep you catch up on in class is not going to get you to your best grades or test scores. Instead, how and when you hit the pillow exerts a tremendous impact on your performance the next day. The Motherlode blog at the New York Times explored the concept of tailoring sleep patterns to desired outcomes. In essence, the author suggests the following: Facing a trivia contest, spelling bee, or test based on memorized information? Go to sleep early to get as much Stage 1 deep sleep as you can. Deep sleep is when the brain consolidates new information. Facing a big sporting event, performance, or test based on practiced physical skills? Sleep late enough to enjoy sufficient quantities of Stage 2 sleep. Stage 2…

Read more

You have probably heard the terms “extrovert” and “introvert.” According to the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, the difference between extraversion (yes, the word is spelled this way in the MBTI) and introversion is the attitude people use to direct their energy. All of us have traits of each, but tend to rely on one more heavily than the other. Extraverts draw their energy from the external world. You know the type: outgoing, life-of-the-party, gregarious, can carry on conversations with anyone about a multitude of topics. The process of interacting with others and engaging with the world energizes the extrovert. As you’d expect, Extraverts prefer active learning and engaging with others: Study in groups where you can bounce ideas off of others Choose learning partners who are motivated to stay on task Employ active listening and reading practices   Introverts, on the other hand, draw their energy from their internal worlds of…

Read more

Imagine two students in a classroom in Any High School, USA. One struggles to concentrate on what the teacher is saying, but finds himself daydreaming instead. Mind ablaze with different ideas, some only tangentially related to the subject at hand, he texts a note about how boring the teacher is to his best friend. She, however, is so busy taking notes, engaged in what she considers a brilliant lecture, that she doesn’t even notice the text. What accounts for the discrepancies in the ways different students experience the same lessons, teachers, and subjects? Some much of the variation comes down to learning style. All of us learn in different ways, not just in the sense of visual, auditory, and tactile processing, but based on deeper factors. Personality types can shed a lot of light on your specific learning style. Any student enrolled in our Roots2Words: Personalities and Perspective Words program…

Read more

Do you have time for an easy quiz? Just answer this one question: Do you do better work after a good night’s sleep or after missing a full night of sleep? Easy, right? Believe it or not, multitasking has the same impact on our work as losing a night’s sleep, according to trials run at King’s College London: In 80 clinical trials, Dr. Glenn Wilson, a psychiatrist at King’s College London University, monitored the IQ of workers throughout the day. He found the IQ of those who tried to juggle messages and work fell by 10 points — the equivalent to missing a whole night’s sleep and more than double the 4-point fall seen after smoking marijuana. Why give up the the mental processing power of 10 full IQ points if you don’t have to? Unless you are part of the supertasker elite, unplug from media and work on one…

Read more

132/133