Chariot Learning Blog

You have probably heard the terms “extrovert” and “introvert.” According to the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, the difference between extraversion (yes, the word is spelled this way in the MBTI) and introversion is the attitude people use to direct their energy. All of us have traits of each, but tend to rely on one more heavily than the other. Extraverts draw their energy from the external world. You know the type: outgoing, life-of-the-party, gregarious, can carry on conversations with anyone about a multitude of topics. The process of interacting with others and engaging with the world energizes the extrovert. As you’d expect, Extraverts prefer active learning and engaging with others: Study in groups where you can bounce ideas off of others Choose learning partners who are motivated to stay on task Employ active listening and reading practices   Introverts, on the other hand, draw their energy from their internal worlds of…

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Recently, Money Magazine identified Money’s Best Colleges based on the idea of Return on Investment: To find out which of the nation’s roughly 1,500 four-year colleges offer the most bang for your tuition buck, MONEY screened out those with a below-average graduation rate and then ranked the 665 that remained on 18 factors in three categories: educational quality, affordability, and alumni earnings… Congratulations, Babson! Money used Payscale.com data, which assembled its own rankings. Congratulations, Harvey Mudd! But is ROI even a meaningful question when considering colleges? I ask the question not because I have an answer, but rather because anyone engaged in the college admissions process should have a clear idea of what they are shopping for. Consultant Parke Muth addresses the issue by analyzing various trends that impact higher education. If you’re grappling with the question of how to evaluate different college choices, you might be interested in this sweeping…

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Despite spending seemingly interminable days at school or doing homework, teens aren’t necessarily learning everything they need for happy, productive lives. Some may even argue that an emphasis on academia overlooks the most important life skills. Melanie Pinola put together a terrific list of Top 10 Skills We Wish Were Taught In School, But Usually Aren’t that is worth a look. Here are her top 10: 1. How To Apply For Jobs And Handle Interviews 2. Mental Health 3. Basic Self-Defense 4. Negotiation Skills 5. Survival Skills 6. Basic Money Management 7. Study Skills (Or Learning How To Learn) 8. Time Management Techniques 9. Speed Reading 10. Computer Science Of course, we work with students on some of these essential skills while our partners cover others. And some of these skills are way outside our scope of service. I generally agree with the author’s findings, but find little evidence that Speed Reading has any…

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Imagine two students in a classroom in Any High School, USA. One struggles to concentrate on what the teacher is saying, but finds himself daydreaming instead. Mind ablaze with different ideas, some only tangentially related to the subject at hand, he texts a note about how boring the teacher is to his best friend. She, however, is so busy taking notes, engaged in what she considers a brilliant lecture, that she doesn’t even notice the text. What accounts for the discrepancies in the ways different students experience the same lessons, teachers, and subjects? Some much of the variation comes down to learning style. All of us learn in different ways, not just in the sense of visual, auditory, and tactile processing, but based on deeper factors. Personality types can shed a lot of light on your specific learning style. Any student enrolled in our Roots2Words: Personalities and Perspective Words program…

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One way going to college can set you up for a great career is if you plan to work for the public sector. As the map below illustrates, every state’s highest paid public employee works for an institute of higher learning: The author of this article hits the nail on the head: You may have heard that the highest-paid employee in each state is usually the football coach at the largest state school. This is actually a gross mischaracterization: Sometimes it is the basketball coach. If you’re not a football or basketball player, don’t worry… there’s always the private sector!

Every day at over at our TestBeast Tumblr, we share motivation for monster test scores. Here are some of our recent favorites…   Any student striving for amazing results in tests, school, and life should visit TestBeast daily. You can also subscribe to the rss feed or follow Chariot Learning on Facebook.

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