Chariot Learning Blog

Personality seems like a rather… personal attribute that we may only share with certain people, offering others only a facade or idealized self. And we may think we succeed in hiding our true selves from the masses, but we reveal ourselves through our deeds. “You are what you do, not what you say you’ll do,” as far as C.G. Jung was concerned. That’s why the last Myers-Briggs Type Indicator focused on how we act in relation to the outside world. Judging (J) types seek order in all things while Perceiving (P) types prefer spontaneity and flexibility.   Judging people should not be considered judgmental (though they may be sometimes) but rather judicious or sensible. Not comfortable with pushing deadlines, Judging types prefer work before play and schedule accordingly. Having a feeling of closure puts Judging types most at ease. Judging types prefer clearly defined tasks with specific timelines and deadlines.…

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Looking to add a lot more words your personal lexicon or just want to better understand the English language? If you learn the common roots, prefixes, and suffixes that so many of our words are based on, you’ll have the tools to recognize familiar words or decode unfamiliar words. That’s the Roots2Words way!   Your Roots2Words Affix of the Week is AF-: AF- is a prefix meaning to or towards. (Prefixes appear at the beginning of words.)   **EXAMPLES** affable (adj) – approachable; easy to speak to BREAKDOWN: AF- (towards) + FAB- (speak) + -BLE (able to be) affiliate (verb) – to connect, unite, or bring into close association; to adopt BREAKDOWN: AF- (towards) + FILI- (flow) + -ATE (being) — an affiliate is a branch, subsidiary, or member of an association affix (verb) – to attach or fasten; to append BREAKDOWN: AF- (to) + FIX- (fasten) — in grammar,…

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Decisions, decisions… we make them all day, every day. Did you ever notice that we can often tell as much about a person by the way she makes decisions than by what she decides? According to the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, we all fall into one of two camps: Thinking (T) types make decisions based on objective facts, logic, and reason, while Feeling (F) types are guided more by personal concerns, values, and relationships.   Thinking people make decisions with their heads, not their hearts. Relying heavily on logic elementary principles, Thinkers like to weigh pros and cons without allowing personal issues to influence the decision making process. Thinking types prefer fact-based, objective instruction with clear course objectives. Seek out logical reasons to engage in learning Be diplomatic with teachers and peers so as to avoid misunderstandings Before you challenge an idea, be sure to consider all possibilities   Feeling people…

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Sports coaches seem to know a lot more about planning for success than the rest of us. How else could you explain their nearly universal success at getting teens to prepare diligently every day for months in advance for a test that might not ever even take place? Most teachers would sacrifice a month of summer for that level of commitment from their students, right? (OK, maybe a week of summer at most…) Athletic coaches, aided of course by the allure of American sports culture, tend to be excellent at eliciting the behaviors required for incremental improvement over time. We can credit a collective acceptance of the aphorism, “You play like you practice,” but should also look beyond that to understand why teen athletes are willing to do whatever it takes to be ready on game day: everyone understands that you cannot become an elite athlete overnight. Well before a…

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Most adult music lovers have heard of John Cage, the pioneering American composer. But even if you don’t know anything about Cage’s copious musical contributions, you can learn from this avant garde influencer’s impact on education. Sister Corita Kent, a personal friend of Cage, credits him with inspiring a list of rules for both teachers and students that has, in turn, inspired very many others. Education, like all other arts, is a process that demands the best work of its collaborators to produce the finest results. Whether you are a student or a teacher (or more likely both), consider applying these clear rules to your craft:   RULE ONE: Find a place you trust, and then try trusting it for a while. RULE TWO: General duties of a student: Pull everything out of your teacher; pull everything out of your fellow students. RULE THREE: General duties of a teacher: Pull…

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What’s going down for the college-bound? Well, if you are a matriculating college student, you’re probably already on campus. If you’re in the high school class of 2015, you’re probably working on your college application essay, right? Everyone else is preparing for a better academic year than the one that now lingers in our memory through a haze of BBQ smoke and sun block! We see a litany of lists ranking the top colleges by any number of metrics. But how many critics have the courage to identify The 35 WORST Colleges In America PERIOD When You Consider Absolutely Everything That Matters? Here are the top (bottom) 10, but read the article for the full list and fine print: And what can any high student work on right now for greater college readiness? Our wise friends at NextStepU suggest keeping your mind on your money. Here is just one money…

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